We have this hope, and since our beginning we have spoken, published, produced, and designed a diversity of materials to share this hope with others. But up until now, we haven’t had a unified strategy for how to present it across the thousands of materials we create every week.

We speak different languages. We dress differently. We have different jobs. Different styles. We live in different countries, cultures, and neighborhoods. We worship God in different ways. We all celebrate, all confess, all shout for joy, in a million different ways. And, we are all Seventh-day Adventists.

And though we may look, pray, read, think, worship, sing, and share differently, we all look forward to the Sabbath. We all look forward to the future, when Jesus will come again. It’s in our very name, this anticipation of the seventh-day Sabbath, and this longing for another Advent. Our history and future as a movement is rooted in this awareness of time, and the prophetic importance of our message in these final hours of earth’s history. We are a diverse people, looking backward and forward, called to share with everyone that the world is on the verge of beauty.

No matter where we are, what our organizations look like, how we live out our beliefs, and how we keep the Sabbath, we are all longing for that last day when we can finally be present with our God.

 

We have this hope, and since our beginning we have spoken, published, produced, and designed a diversity of materials to share this hope with others. But up until now, we haven’t had a unified strategy for how to present it across the thousands of materials we create every week.

Our churches, ministries, and organizations have spent such a long time trying to stand out that it can be difficult for people to tell we all stand together. In designing on our own, we have sometimes forgotten to think about our context and what would best help our audience know we are part of the same body. As the world becomes overwhelmed with information, as consumer brands evolve their approach, and as content producers saturate the market, it is becoming increasingly important to find a way to help people know we are all Seventh-day Adventists.

So how can we present ourselves? How can we use typefaces, colors, patterns, images, and layouts to let people know they are looking at Adventist materials? How can we set up a system that supports an ever-increasing number of formats, mediums, and materials?

Most importantly, how can we create a system flexible enough to accommodate our diversity, while still presenting ourselves as a unified body?

After months of prayerfully exploring these tough questions, testing different approaches, and collaborating with church communicators and designers across the world, we’ve developed a system we believe can achieve our goals of supporting both unity and diversity. It is our earnest belief that global participation in this living, dynamic identity system will aid in sharing the beautiful news of the Advent message in effective and compelling ways.

These guidelines were developed to anticipate and accommodate our differences, both in the content of our materials, and the styles we design in. The core elements of the system are few, but if adopted consistently, they will have a powerful impact on the mission of the church.

These guidelines describe the core elements and principles of our identity system. They are intended to be dynamic, consisting of regular updates as we learn from members and church leadership about what works best for their respective audiences. While the new official church logo is available for download in almost a hundred languages, this initial iteration of the guidelines primarily addresses entities in majority English-speaking regions. This 2.0 version, with the new global elements, provides a strong foundation for the important task of working with division communication leaders and international designers to explore how the system can be extended or modified for local contexts.

Because language and culture are dynamic we have made sure these guidelines are not set in stone as commandments, but are also dynamic. Some regions may feel the need to adapt these principles for their specific contexts. We strongly encourage entities to think deeply about what works best for their respective audiences. However, what works best for most audiences in our increasingly mobile and interconnected world is to recognize we are all Seventh-day Adventists, so it is best to communicate clearly to avoid visual fragmentation. This means any major change or extension to these guidelines will require a global discussion and new decisions by our governing bodies.

The ultimate goal of this work is to help people know we are all Seventh-day Adventists. We ask that you join us in letting people know we are all different, but all excited about the beauty that is soon to come.

The most important element in the design system is what we are calling the “Creation Grid.” This is a seven-column layout structure to be used in the majority of design situations to communicate our conviction that all time leads to a beautiful end.

The first six columns are yours to fill with text, images, illustrations, patterns, logos or anything else, and in those six columns you should do all your work of communicating information. But the seventh-column, the Sabbath column, is to be set apart—to be special and different from the other six columns, as a reminder and visual celebration of the last day.

We all celebrate the Sabbath in different ways, so how you make the Sabbath column different and special is, to an extent, up to you. The principle to keep in mind is contrast. You can do something complex and colorful in the first six columns, or you can do that with the seventh column, but if you do it on both sides then the seventh-column is no longer different.

Other than that, the Sabbath column can be filled with just about any background element—a full-bleed image, a texture, pattern, illustration, bold colors, a gradient, or even white space—as long as it is beautiful and fills the entire column. Aside from full-background elements, the seventh-column should never include identifying marks or text of any kind, with the exception of the Adventist Symbol.
Though the Adventist Symbol can be placed anywhere in a layout, it is the only non-background element that may be placed in the Sabbath column.

There are certainly instances when using the grid might not make sense for your particular context or application. In those instances it is permissible and even encouraged that you ignore the grid and place the symbol/artwork as needed. This would typically apply to applications in which the symbol stands alone or is not intended to be integrated with the surrounding layout.

Key

The visual explanations of the guidelines across the site use the above three symbols to note acceptable applications of the system.
The green checkmark (✓) notes acceptable and preferred applications. You can reliably use applications with the green checkmark across many different contexts without needing to worry much about visual coherence.
The yellow exclamation point (!) notes applications that are acceptable but not preferred. When using these applications, you should be very careful to note how other visual elements interact with the specific element.
The red X notes unacceptable applications of the system. While this visual system isn’t something to be enforced, those applications noted with the X could either cause a fragmentation of the identity or simply be poorly designed.

The Seventh-day Adventist symbol, which many people think of as the “logo,” has been in use since 1997, and is the most recognizable element of our existing visual identity system. Though it may not communicate everything, because of its consistent use it now carries a deep significance for all who are familiar with it. The symbol, like all symbols, functions much more as a container for attributed meaning than as a theological statement. It is we, Seventh-day Adventist members, who give that symbol meaning. Because of the meaning it already holds, establishing over 20 years of brand equity, the shapes of the symbol remain largely unchanged from the original. The symbol is a registered trademark of the Seventh-day Adventist church, and use of the symbol is important in instances when communicating an official association with the Seventh-day Adventist church. The registered trademark may be used by the Seventh-day Adventist Church, its entities, institutions (including churches and schools) as authorized by the General Conference of Seventh-day Adventists, its divisions, unions and conferences.

The Seventh-day Adventist logo
Aside from ensuring that the symbol continues to appear on materials, the new system affords a wide level of flexibility. The symbol is now free to exist in isolation, detached from the name of the church or entity. It is still preferable for the symbol to have a thoughtful relationship to the rest of the design system. We recommend in most cases, where the symbol is detached, it sit within in the Sabbath column. When not using the Adventist symbol within the Sabbath column or locked up with an entity name, the preferred version is the knocked-out circular version, which allows for more graphically pleasing layouts.
Additionally, the symbol is now allowed to exist in a variety of colors. Moving forward, it is recommended the symbol only be used in solid-color versions. The symbol may be a different color than the accompanying wordmarks, but all elements of the symbol should appear in the same color.
Beyond deciding which version of the symbol to use, and which color to use it in, it is requested that you make no creative modifications to the symbol. It is important that our most globally recognized element continues to be easily recognized. To help our audience, it is requested that you do not modify or integrate the logo, or any parts of it, either in isolation or as part of any other entity logo, unless given express permission by the General Conference. Though this is primarily about visual strategy, there are some legal restrictions governing registered trademarks, and more information about that can be found on our legal page.

Symbol in Lockup

Symbol in Sabbath Column

Symbol in Isolation

The Meaning of the Logo
The logo reflects the core values of the Seventh-day Adventist Church. Its foundation is the Bible, the Word of God, shown open because its message should be read and put into practice. Central to that biblical message is the cross, which is also a central feature of the logo. Above the cross and the open Bible is a burning flame that represents the Holy Spirit, the messenger of truth.

The Second Coming
The lines at the top of the design suggest upward momentum symbolizing the resurrection and ascension to heaven at Christ’s second coming, the ultimate focus of our faith.

The Flame
This is the shape formed by three lines encircling an implied sphere. The lines represent the three angels of Revelation 14 circling the globe and our commission to take the gospel to the entire world. The overall shape forms a flame symbolic of the Holy Spirit.

The Cross
The symbol of the cross, representing the gospel of salvation, is positioned in the center of the design to emphasize Christ’s sacrifice, which is the central theme of the Adventist faith.

The Open Bible
The Bible forms the base of the design and represents the biblical foundation of our beliefs. It is portrayed in a fully open position suggesting a full acceptance of God’s word.

Key

The visual explanations of the guidelines across the site use the above three symbols to note acceptable applications of the system.
The green checkmark (✓) notes acceptable and preferred applications. You can reliably use applications with the green checkmark across many different contexts without needing to worry much about visual coherence.
The yellow exclamation point (!) notes applications that are acceptable but not preferred. When using these applications, you should be very careful to note how other visual elements interact with the specific element.
The red X notes unacceptable applications of the system. While this visual system isn’t something to be enforced, those applications noted with the X could either cause a fragmentation of the identity or simply be poorly designed.

While many people think of the Adventist symbol as the church logo, typically “logo” refers to the combination of a symbol with a custom type treatment of a name (think Apple or Nike). For some organizations a logo consists simply of custom type, known as a wordmark (eg Google). For our organization, however, it isn’t useful or even possible to create a type treatment for a single name and ensure its consistent usage across the world. Our name changes in every language, and every entity has it’s own unique name. New churches are being formed and named every few minutes, most including more detail than simply “Seventh-day Adventist Church.”

While this project began as a commission to extend the logo system, we discovered through the process that we need something more useful than hundreds of custom wordmarks. What we need is a global, multi-language type system.

By chance, or by Providence, there is at the moment only one existing universal typeface in the world, and it was recently released. Commissioned by Google and designed by the renowned Monotype foundry, Noto’s extensive language coverage took five years to design, cost millions of dollars to create, and now covers over 800 languages.

We chose to use Noto as the basis for what we are calling Advent Sans. Built on the extensive language coverage of Noto Sans, Advent Sans will allow us to communicate consistency across the world. We have made extensive modifications to the latin and cyrillic alphabets, and where applicable, we have made some recommendations for non-western character sets.

Unless using pre-existing entity logos/wordmarks, it is recommended that entities transition to or use Advent Sans to set their entity names moving forward. Using the provided font files and name-setting templates can help ensure a consistent visual device that can help viewers recognize we are all Seventh-day Adventists.

Advent Sans fonts are open source. All Advent Sans fonts are published under the SIL Open Font License, Version 1.1. You may find the most current Advent Sans fonts and naming templates here:

Because color means different things across the world, there is no official global color or color system. Where it seems valuable to create internal or regional consistency for missional purposes, world divisions are encouraged to create carefully thought-out systems that work to differentiate their materials within their individual contexts.

Recommended regional color systems will, therefore, be determined by local world divisions, and will be visible on this site as they become available. In the meantime, please contact your communication department for guidance.

If your division has not yet provided a color system, the recommended base palette is built upon the work done for ALPS, which can be viewed here.

Within this new, variable color system, the symbol can be adapted to match or compliment other layout elements, provided the symbol always remain a single, solid color. It is recommended that the Sabbath column be used as an area for tasteful color usage. If using the symbol over a color in the Sabbath column it should appear in white.